Prisons

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    Guantanamo Is Not an Exception: U.S. Prison Policy, from California to Cuba

    December 16, 2013 - 

    In this podcast, artists Chitra Ganesh and Mariam Ghani, whose work explores subjects like the prison at Guantanamo Bay and the “war on terror,” speak with human rights lawyers Alexis Agathocleous and Ramzi Kassem about U.S. prison policy across the globe.  More
  • Ricardo Cortes

    Residents of Rikers Island, In Portraits

    November 26, 2013 - 

    Who are the 10,000-plus people in New York City’s jails? Illustrator Ricardo Cortés, who runs art workshops at the Rikers Island detention complex, describes “cages” filled with those who can’t afford to post bail—who are disproportionately poor, black and brown, and often mentally ill.  More
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    Faces From Gitmo

    September 2, 2013 - 

    As a months-long hunger strike persists in the prison at Guantanamo Bay, Molly Crabapple’s drawings of seven detainees—one of whom was released last week—challenge us to remember their history and humanity.  More
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    The Bradley Manning Truth Battalion

    July 31, 2013 - 

    Bradley Manning faces up to 136 years in prison for espionage, though he was cleared of the most serious charge, “aiding the enemy.” As sentencing begins, artist Molly Crabapple describes the enthusiastic support for Manning at the military court in Fort Meade.  More
  • Bradley Manning and Us

    Just Following Orders: Bradley Manning and Us

    June 3, 2013 - 

    The trial of Bradley Manning begins today, three years after his arrest. Manning faces a life sentence for “aiding the enemy,” but artist Molly Crabapple argues the soldier only betrayed his institution out of loyalty to humanity.  More
  • PR

    Editor’s Letter

    Five years after Creative Time Reports’ inception, the project is coming to a close. Editor Marisa Mazria Katz reflects on some of the most moving pieces that solidified CTR as a unique platform that elevates artists’ voices.

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